Hundred Years War

The interminable series of conflicts between England and France which lasted from May 1337 to October 1453. Although it was initiated by a clash over control of the Flemish wool trade, the roots of this conflict dated back to William the Conqueror with competing claims over the French crown and territory.
During this miserable 116 year period, there were at least 68 years of "official peace" interspersed with periods of conflict and full scale war.
The war finally ended in 1453 when the French regained Aquitaine after the battle of Castillon. They had previously regained Normandy in 1450 at the battle of Formigny. However, England retained the port city of Calais until 1558.
The protracted conflict between England and France from 1337 to 1453. Edward III began the war in earnest when he assumed the title ‘king of France’ in 1337. The war was fought in stops and starts, with numerous truces and false instances of peace, during which there were many battles fought. The tactics of chevauchйe and siege warfare were used with great effect. Early English victories at Crиcy, Poitiers and Agincourt were gradually reversed until the last English holding on the continent, (except for Calais), fell in 1453.

Medieval glossary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

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